The mystique of black and white.

A relaxing longboarding wave at Bilgol Beach, Sydney.

A relaxing longboarding wave at Bilgol Beach, Sydney.

I’ve been very, very familiar with black and white photography over the years, especially back in the day. I’ve processed countless rolls of Kodak Tri-X, Ilfopan and Agfapan over the years. Always a thrill to pop the neg’s on top of a sheet of paper and put a sheet of glass over before exposing the paper to a few seconds of light. Then of course processing, fixing and washing the prints.
What really attracted me to black and white initially were some really cool architectual pics that my brother Anthony took around some building foyers and stuff. The patterns in all the architecture jumped to life in monotone. That was when I got it. Then I discovered photographers who were veritable B&W photographer-rock stars in their time. Guys like Ansell Adams
and his beautiful http://www.anseladams.com and then there was Max Dupain. This guy’s work spoke to me on a purely subliminal level. I say this because I knew his work just from his way of capturing beach scenes on hot Australian days. Always had really hard shadows, almost. looked like paintings in some way. I love black and white. To me it truly is even more so of an artform than color photography simply because you are working one less medium. (color) Though most of my commercial work over the years has been in color, I’ve always dabbled in black and white and added to the folio along the way. I added a black and white gallery to my site recently and am showing you an image from that gallery today, called Solitary Glass. I photographed this one probably 30 years ago at Bilgola Beach, located on sydney’s far northern beaches, nestled in between Avalon and Newport beaches. Enjoy!

Sean

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